Press Kit

Proctors by the numbers

200 employees, 700,000 patrons, $25 million budget across all venues

Proctors is the region’s busiest performing arts center, hosting the best of touring Broadway, music, dance, comedy, film and special events across five stages. Proctors also manages Capital Repertory Theatre, Universal Preservation Hall, the School of Performing Arts at Proctors, Marquee Power and Open Stage Media; and serves as an umbrella for partner organizations like The Schenectady Symphony Orchestra, The Eighth Step, Story Circle, Schenectady Greenmarket and Classic Theater Guild.

at Proctors
CEO Philip Morris
Approximately 200 full and part-time employees
650,000 patrons served annually
1,750 uses of the building annually
$25 million budget
180,000 square feet

MainStage
State-of-the-art proscenium stage in 1926 Thomas Lamb auditorium; movie screen; seats 2,696

GE Theatre.
Contemporary black box theatre; movie screen; seats 434

Other spaces:
Underground at Proctors, Fenimore Asset Management Gallery and Robb Alley are malleable performance spaces, with seating capacity based on configuration. Harry Apkarian Stage, Key Hall, DeLack Guild Room, Wright Family Atrium, Albany International Room and Taylor Made Group Room are event spaces capable of hosting 30–700 based on configuration.

at Capital Repertory Theatre
Capital Repertory Theatre, in downtown Albany, is the only professional, producing playhouse within a 14-county range. Dedicated to the creation of new works, theREP has staged almost 30 world premieres since 1981. Producing Artistic Director Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill50,000 patrons served annually$2.5 million budget4,000 square feet (auditorium and thrust stage)

at Universal Preservation Hall
Currently under a $5.5 million renovation, UPH will become a year round destination in late 2018 in Saratoga Springs’ friendly, walkable downtown, presenting top tier live music, theatre and special events on arena stage in an 1871 Victorian Gothic church. Campaign Director Teddy Foster Projected 65,000 patrons served annuallyProjected $2 million budget13,000 square feet

School of Performing Arts at Proctors
The School of the Performing Arts at Proctors has a broad, encompassing vision that embraces School Day performances, Broadway Camp, MediaWorks, theREP’s On-The-Go! program and more.Education Director Christine Sheehan
45,000 students served annually400 schools, 100 districts, 14 counties

Marquee Power Marquee Power at Proctors is the only district energy system in the country run by a theatre—heating and cooling one million square feet over seven properties; reducing the carbon footprint in downtown Schenectady by over 500 metric tons of CO2/year.

Open Stage Media Open Stage Media is a full-service video production facility, which produces and provides content for three public access broadcast streams.

Apostrophe Café Established in 2011, Apostrophe Café at Proctors features a full line of beverages, pastries and movie snacks as well as breakfast sandwiches, lunch selections and light dinner fare.

Creative economy initiative Proctors is a founding member of Upstate Alliance for Creative Economy, and part of a regional effort to support innovation, invention and creative workforce development.

Teching Proctors hosts technical rehearsals of at least one Broadway tour annually, with a $5 million investment from producers yielding $50 million in economic impact, including use of regional hotels, restaurants, transportation, goods and services.

Timeline
Dec. 26, 1926
Proctors opens at 432 State Street, Schenectady as vaudeville hall and movie palace.
1929 (Proctors sold to RK). 1930 First public display of television on Proctors stage.
1940s–1970s Ownership passes to the Fabian cinema chain, and Proctors is operated primarily as a first run movie house. A number of other owners follow, but as suburban multiplexes proliferate throughout the 1970s, the venue falls into arrears and disrepair.
1977 Arts Center and Theatre of Schenectady, Inc. formed by concerned citizens with purpose of securing, owning and operating Proctors as a performing arts center.
1979 Proctors, purchased by ACTS from the city for $1, re-opens and is listed on National Register of Historic Places.
1981 Physical plant improvements including new carpeting and sound system. 1983 Construction of new “1926” marquee; acquisition of “Goldie” theatre organ.
1985 Schenectady County hotel/motel bed tax passed to benefit theatre.
1999 Conclusion of seven years of extensive renovation including roof replacement, stage floor replacement, plaster repair, dressing room redecoration, ceiling dome restoration and installation of air conditioning.
2002 Arrival of CEO Philip Morris, former executive director of Arts Council of Chautauqua County.
2004 Preparation and planning for $40 million renovation/expansion.
2006 Completion of Marquee Power district energy plant.
2007 Completion of massive construction project including expansion of MainStage, creation of GE Theatre, Fenimore Asset Management Gallery and café and lobby spaces; acquisition of Carl Company building for administrative space.
2011 Proctors assumes management of Capital Repertory Theatre.
2015 Proctors assumes management of Universal Preservation Hall; final phase of multi-decade Proctors restoration, with extensive scagliola, gold leaf and plaster work returning theatre to its 1926 glory.
2016 Announcement of proposed $2.5 million Adeline Graham Theatrical Training and Innovation Center, to be built on third floor of former Carl Company.